Historical beliefs

Believer or skeptic, how methods of spiritual communication came about is an interesting subject. Here we look at beliefs of days gone by and the methods used to protect or communicate.

Showing category "History" (Show all posts)

Day of the dead

Posted by Cally on Sunday, October 4, 2009, In : History 

The day of the dead is a special holiday celebrated each year to honour the dead, involving parties, feasts and songs; traditionally this day is celebrated in Mexico

Unlike holidays like Memorial Day or Veterans Day, where we remember those who died fighting for our country, the day of the dead brings together the living and the dead for a massive celebration to remember the dead and keep them happy for another year.


The official day of the dead (el dia de los muertos) is November 2nd, a...


Continue reading ...
 

Quick guide Zener cards

Posted by Cally on Tuesday, September 29, 2009, In : History 

Originally, tests for ESP were conducted using a standard deck of playing cards, now most testing of telepathy and precognition is done using Zener cards or ESP (extra sensory perception) cards. Designed by Dr Karl Zener in the early 1930’s.

Over the years Zener cards have had many incarnations. The early cards were produced onto wafer thin pieces of paper, when it was discovered that receivers were able to identify what was on the cards by looking at the back of them, they were changed so...


Continue reading ...
 

History Of Witchcraft

Posted by Stuckie on Monday, August 31, 2009, In : History 

The word witchcraft means "craft of the wise." The word Wicca means "wise one" . Witchcraft is the oldest of all religions and was alive well before the Druids. The Druids were sun-worshippers who were thought to have built Stonehenge, but this British landmark was built much earlier in 1800 B.C. The Druids were not around until the fifth (5th) century B.C. For a time, Druidism was the official religion of the British Isles. Many witches were Christians. The Christian church taught reincarnat...


Continue reading ...
 

SALEM WITCHES:

Posted by Atticus on Friday, February 27, 2009, In : History 


In 1692 Salem was an unremarkable town in Massachusetts. In this Puritanical stronghold witch fever took hold and spread throughout the population; neighbour e denounced neighbour and children accused well respected townsfolk of hideous Satanic practises. Before the frenzy had evaporated it claimed the lives of 22 people and two dogs, who were also executed for practising witchcraft.

The furore was sparked in the minds of impressionable children. A group of girls habitually met in the home o...


Continue reading ...
 

INQUISITORS & THE WITCHES CRAZE

Posted by Atticus on Friday, February 27, 2009, In : History 


Catholic elders of the Middle-Ages believed Europe was blighted by a witch epidemic. Their reaction was to send in the Inquisition. Already tried and tested against the like and so called heretics over the past centuries, the inquisitor monks had wide ranging powers to seek out witches……and destroy them.

In the year of 1484 Pope Innocent VIII issued what is known as a Papa Bull that declared all ‘…(witches) do not shrink from committing and perpetrating the foulest abominations and f...


Continue reading ...
 

WITCHES’ SABBATH:

Posted by Atticus on Friday, February 27, 2009, In : History 


As darkness fell, witches sneaked out of their houses to mount broomsticks, fire-rakes, cats or even hypnotised human beings, their destination was the sabbath or sabbat, the witches’ orgy. The Sabbath was a mixture of flames and feasting, with toads lurking in the undergrowth and owls dipping soundlessly overhead joined by the odd screech from a bat.


The witches definitely knew how to throw a feasting party on a budget! For most part, the food was stolen. But there was a carefully made ca...


Continue reading ...
 

HALLOWE'EN:

Posted by Atticus on Friday, February 27, 2009, In : History 

As winter drew near, the superstitious Celts were gripped by fear. If the gods were angry the sun might never shine again. With the prolonged hours of darkness the spirits of the dead were free to roam the earth. Against this background of dread a special celebration evolved some 2,000 years ago to protect and nourish.

In Celtic Britain winter lasted from 1st November to 30th April and summer arrived on 1st May. Officially the end of summer was on 31st October, which was the feast day to the...


Continue reading ...
 

ANCIENT RITUALS:

Posted by Atticus on Friday, February 27, 2009, In : History 


It’s stated that superstition is a form of layman’s magic. In a bygone age beset by marauding devils and sorcery, people were constantly on the look-out for possible harbingers of ill-fortune and fate. As a result they looked no further than home for remedies against the evil forces.

Let’s start this off by taking a look at chimney-sweeps, blacksmiths and ladders. But also bearing in mind that life amongst the superstitious can be quite complex.
The chimney-sweep, thought by many to be ...


Continue reading ...
 

Merlin: Magician or Madman?

Posted by Atticus on Friday, February 27, 2009, In : History 

Magician or madman, wily wizard or guardian of the good, Merlin is alive in the minds of schoolchildren today as mentor to the heroic King Arthur. But did he really live at all? The legend of Camelot’s court magician has been scrutinised down the centuries, yet the facts are still few and hazy.

Much of today’s perception of Merlin comes via Geoffrey of Monmouth, whose work includes ‘Vita Merlin’ and ‘The Prophecies of Merlin’.
These were written in the 12th century but are still c...


Continue reading ...